Jay Reding.com

Watch For Flying Pigs And Imps On Ice Skates

I almost feel sorry for Hillary Clinton after tonight’s debate.

Hillary Clinton’s strength came from the fact that during the Clinton years she had a sympathetic media willing to carry her water. Tonight, we saw what Hillary is without her fawning media—and it isn’t pretty. Obama was Mr. Cool, was clearly in command and was clearly acting exactly like a frontrunner should. Hillary was not. She cackled inappropriately, she got flustered, and her lines of attack just didn’t work.

There’s no doubt in my mind that Hillary will not last beyond the Ohio and Texas primaries, and she’ll lose both of them. The 2008 match will be between Barack Obama and John McCain.

The Clinton years are over, at long last.

6 responses to “Watch For Flying Pigs And Imps On Ice Skates”

  1. adb67 says:

    And she came across as the harsh, nasty person she is. Her insinuation that becuase Obama denounced and did not use the word reject with regard to Farrakhan was an attempt to portray him as antisemitic. She came across very poorly as she did when whining about getting the first question and the pillow comment….shes a nasty woman who sees her career aspiration going down the tube.

    As for the general election, I think McCain has a real problem. Who knows if conservatives will come home to him. Obama has stolen the independent vote from him, is bringing out the black and youth vote and is attracting crossover republicans. McCain often comes across these days as a grumpy old man…..I think he is going to lose this election and it wont be all that close in the end.

  2. Jay Reding says:

    As for the general election, I think McCain has a real problem. Who knows if conservatives will come home to him. Obama has stolen the independent vote from him, is bringing out the black and youth vote and is attracting crossover republicans. McCain often comes across these days as a grumpy old man…..I think he is going to lose this election and it wont be all that close in the end.

    That’s what Obama’s people claim, but the polling so far shows that not to be the case.

    Obama’s essential problem is that he doesn’t reach those who aren’t already Democratic. The Democrats already have the black vote and a majority of the youth vote. Will Barack Obama have much pull with Southern evangelicals? I rather doubt it. With older voters? Again, I don’t see that happening.

    McCain will have a very tough fight on his hands, but the contrast between someone who has never managed anything larger than a law school classroom and a man who spent years at the Hanoi Hilton, led a squadron in the Navy, and has a long record of government service could not be greater.

  3. adb67 says:

    I dont dispute his credentials. But I can vouch for the fact that I know at least a half dozen republicans who are good friends who are sticking by their vow not to vote republican due to their unhappiness with how the GOP leadership allowed spending to go out of control, their unhappiness with the Iraq war. They are saying they are voting for the dem candidate as a way of thumbing their nose at the GOP and making a statement….

  4. Mark says:

    “There’s no doubt in my mind that Hillary will not last beyond the Ohio and Texas primaries, and she’ll lose both of them.”

    I think she’ll still win Ohio, albeit by a smaller margin than was predicted a week ago.

    “Obama’s essential problem is that he doesn’t reach those who aren’t already Democratic. The Democrats already have the black vote and a majority of the youth vote.”

    Show me a single poll where McCain isn’t losing to Obama. And among independents to boot. I’m not saying it’ll hold up amidst the coming firestorm of scrutiny Obama will face, but as long as John McCain continues to channel the “grumpy old man” campaign of Bob Dole circa 1996 as he has been, I won’t count Obama out.

    “Will Barack Obama have much pull with Southern evangelicals?”

    Of course not. Was there ever any speculation that he would? And are you suggesting that Barack Obama can’t be elected President without winning over Roy Moore disciples?

    “With older voters? Again, I don’t see that happening.”

    Older voters are definitely Obama’s weakest link, and why the Democrats should all but write off Florida this cycle.

    “McCain will have a very tough fight on his hands, but the contrast between someone who has never managed anything larger than a law school classroom and a man who spent years at the Hanoi Hilton, led a squadron in the Navy, and has a long record of government service could not be greater.”

    If this year’s primaries have taught us anything, it’s that the 2008 electorate does not put a very high premium on “experience” and resume bullet points. Most people aren’t gonna vote for John McCain based on his heroism of decades past anymore they voted for George McGovern based on his decorated record of public service and heroism. If you guys intend to run a campaign based upon John McCain being “awesome in the early 1970s”, you will lose.

  5. Seth0d says:

    How much money are you willing to put on the Ohio primary?

    You don’t have to bet it with me, just put your money where your mouth is if you are completely sure of the outcome.

    You are one of the poorest political minds I have ever seen when it comes to predicting races–even among Republicans–and I’m just wondering if you really think what you write or it’s all bluster.

  6. Jay Reding says:

    I think she’ll still win Ohio, albeit by a smaller margin than was predicted a week ago.

    I’m starting to agree, and she may actually do better than I’d thought. She appears to have stemmed the bleeding now, and is actually getting some traction against Obama. I would have figured that her numbers would have slipped in Ohio as time wore on, but they don’t appear to have done so.

    I’m not sure what I like better—a Democratic contest that drags out forever and puts the party in turmoil or a quick and decisive end to the shameful Clinton regime.