Jay Reding.com

A Price Of Valor

It has been revealed (thanks to an irresponsible leak) that Britain’s Prince Harry, third in line to the throne, has been fighting in Afghanistan with the British Army.

For all the justifiable talk about how the monarchy has become an irrelevancy in modern Britain, there’s something refreshing about seeing Prince Harry serving his nation as something more than a figurehead. His attitudes towards all of this has been nothing short of exemplary:

In a recent interview with CNN correspondent Paula Newton, Prince Harry said, “At the end of the day I like to sort of be a normal person, and for once I think this is about as normal as I’m ever going to get.”

And in a pre-deployment interview with the British Press Association, he said: “If I’m wanted, if I’m needed, then I will serve my country as I signed up to do.”

Prince Harry has demonstrated the sort of personal valor and spirit of sacrifice that should be an example to all Britons. The British people need more like him.

2 responses to “A Price Of Valor”

  1. Seth0d says:

    Would be nice if those supporting the war would encourage their children to attend.

    Of course, the only problem is that in America, I believe the only children to be the children of Members of Congress and to serve as enlisted personnel in the conflict are the children of Democrats.

    I’d like to see a policy that requires some of your family or children to be serving as enlisted members of the military force before Americans are committed to a war/conflict.

  2. Jay Reding says:

    Of course, the only problem is that in America, I believe the only children to be the children of Members of Congress and to serve as enlisted personnel in the conflict are the children of Democrats.

    That’s utterly wrong. For one, Sen. McCain’s son recently returned from a tour of duty in Iraq with the US Marines.

    I’d like to see a policy that requires some of your family or children to be serving as enlisted members of the military force before Americans are committed to a war/conflict.

    Which is a sentiment that is profoundly against the principle of American democracy. We have a military that is controlled by civilians, and everyone has the right to speak out on military issues. Why should it not then be that you cannot speak out against a war unless you’ve served the military? For that matter, why bother with civilian control of the military at all?

    Unless you think that “Starship Troopers” was good social policy, the “chickenhawk” argument is a sign of desperation.